Level up your Azure Platform as a Service applications with Pulumi

Posted by Mikhail Shilkov on May 6, 2019 9:50:20 AM

Today's guest post is from Mikhail Shilkov, a Microsoft Azure MVP and early Pulumi user and contributor - enjoy!


Today I want to guide you through the process of developing Pulumi programs to leverage Azure Platform-as-a-Service (PaaS) services. My language of choice is TypeScript—a powerful and expressive typed language, which is very familiar to many Azure users.

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Topics: Infrastructure, Azure

Get Started with Docker on AWS Fargate using Pulumi

Posted by Joe Duffy on Apr 30, 2019 11:44:46 AM

The Docker Getting Started tutorial shows how to develop, build, and run a modern containerized application, from a single custom Docker container published to the Docker Hub, to a scaled out service with load balancing. But there are challenges: it requires you to program in YAML, run (or script) many CLI commands, and manage your own Swarm or Kubernetes cluster. There is an easier way. By using Pulumi’s infrastructure as code, we can build a custom Docker image, publish it to a private AWS container registry, and spin up an AWS Fargate load balanced service running that container, all in 28 lines of TypeScript code and a single pulumi up command. The result leverages the best of what AWS has to offer, with the entire platform at your fingertips, with a single approach. In this article, we’ll see how.

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Topics: JavaScript, AWS, Containers, Infrastructure, TypeScript

Managing F5 BIG-IP Systems with Pulumi

Posted by Cameron Stokes on Feb 7, 2019 4:57:10 PM

The Pulumi ecosystem is continuously growing and today we’re excited to announce the F5 BIG-IP provider for Pulumi.

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Topics: Infrastructure, Cloud Native Infrastructure

From Terraform to Infrastructure as Software

Posted by Pat Gavlin on Nov 2, 2018 12:25:25 PM

Here at Pulumi, we love programming the cloud using infrastructure as code. From the project’s outset, we’ve been inspired by technologies like Terraform, AWS CloudFormation, and Helm, and in fact leverage the Terraform Providers ecosystem, to support a broad range of clouds, including AWS, Azure, and Google Cloud. Just recently, we extended this with first class support for Kubernetes. Pulumi delivers the same infrastructure as code workflows only using general purpose languages like JavaScript, TypeScript, Python, and Go, extending robust infrastructure provisioning with abstraction and reuse, highly productive tooling, and access to all the other things we already know and love about programming languages.

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Topics: JavaScript, Infrastructure, TypeScript

Data science on demand: spinning up a Wallaroo cluster is easy with Pulumi

Posted by Marc Holmes on Nov 2, 2018 8:10:13 AM

This guest post is from Simon Zelazny of Wallaroo Labs, and previously appeared on the Wallaroo Labs blog. Find out how Wallaroo powered their cluster provisioning with Pulumi, for data science on demand. 

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Topics: Infrastructure, Customer

Simple, Reproducible Kubernetes Deployments

Posted by Alex Clemmer on Aug 24, 2018 5:04:52 PM

Kubernetes is a powerful container orchestrator for cloud native applications that can run on any cloud -- AWS, Azure, GCP -- in addition to hybrid and on-premises environments. Its CLI, kubectl, offers basic built-in support for performing deployments, but intentionally stops short here. In particular, it doesn't offer diffs and previews, the ability to know when a deployment has succeeded or failed, and why, and/or sophisticated deployment orchestration.

In this post, we’ll see how Pulumi, an open source cloud native development platform, can not only let you express Kubernetes programs in real programming languages, like TypeScript, instead of endless YAML templates, but also how Pulumi delivers simple and reproducible, yet powerful, Kubernetes deployment workflows.

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Topics: Infrastructure, Kubernetes, TypeScript

Creating and Reusing Cloud Components using Package Managers

Posted by Chris Smith on Aug 9, 2018 4:19:00 PM

Hello! A few weeks back I wrote a post detailing how to host a static website on AWS. Pulumi allowed me to wire four different AWS products together in only 200 lines of code. It would be a shame, however if I needed to copy and paste that code every time I wanted to to stand up a new website. Instead, we can package up, share, and reuse our code just like any other Node.js library. It just so happens that this one can be used to create cloud infrastructure.

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Topics: Infrastructure

Program the Cloud with 12 Pulumi Pearls

Posted by Joe Duffy on Jul 25, 2018 12:06:01 PM

In this post, we’ll look at 12 “pearls” – bite-sized code snippets – that demonstrate some fun ways you can program the cloud using Pulumi. In my introductory post, I mentioned a few of my “favorite things”. Now let’s dive into a few specifics, from multi-cloud to cloud-specific, spanning containers, serverless, and infrastructure, and generally highlighting why using real languages is so empowering for cloud scenarios. Since Pulumi lets you do infrastructure-as-code from the lowest-level to the highest, we will cover a lot of interesting ground in short order.

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Topics: Serverless, AWS, Containers, Infrastructure, TypeScript

Provisioning and managing cloud infrastructure with Pulumi

Posted by Donna Malayeri on Jul 20, 2018 12:17:12 PM

If you’ve been following the blog, you know that Pulumi is great for building serverless applications, container-based applications, and a combination of the two. But, did you know that you can manage any cloud resource in AWS, Azure, or Google Cloud Platform?

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Topics: JavaScript, AWS, Infrastructure

Serving a Static Website on AWS with Pulumi

Posted by Chris Smith on Jul 17, 2018 9:21:50 AM

Hello! This post covers using Pulumi to create the infrastructure for serving a static website on AWS. The full source code for this example is available on GitHub.

Setting up the infrastructure to serve a static website doesn’t sound like it would be all that difficult, but when you consider HTTPS certificates, content distribution networks, and attaching it to a custom domain, integrating all the components can be quite daunting. 

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Topics: AWS, Infrastructure, TypeScript